Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection Rumbles Onto Switch May 2018

Get your arcade sticks ready, because the Mega Man collections were just the beginning: Capcom will bring Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection onto the Nintendo Switch in May 2018! 

This compilation will contain no less that twelve arcade perfect ports of the series as follows:

  • Street Fighter
  • Street Fighter II
  • Street Fighter II: Champion Edition
  • Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting
  • Super Street Fighter II
  • Super Street Fighter II: Turbo
  • Street Fighter Alpha
  • Street Fighter Alpha 2
  • Street Fighter Alpha 3
  • Street Fighter III
  • Street Fighter III: 2nd Impact
  • Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike

Notice that in the case of Street Fighter III this will be the very first time the game will be available on a Nintendo console. Besides the games there will be extras features like concept art and sprite viewers with online play added for the four definitive entries in each of the sub-series (Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting, Super Street Fighter II: Turbo, Street Fighter Alpha 3 and Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike). You can check out the announcement trailer below.

Truly big a step up from Capcom’s previous Switch offering. Will you take on the mean streets again next May? On a personal side note, this humble NL retro contributor is really happy to have previously invested on one of these. No way the JoyCon would be able to handle the kind of punishment needed to pull off some of those special moves beyond the Alpha series.

Review: World Heroes (Switch eShop / Neo Geo)

Many, many fighting games were released on the Neo Geo and these are slowly but surely filling up the Switch’s eShop. Compared to most of the options available World Heroes and its sequels offer a simpler experience with less depth, but the series can still entertain when its varied cast of fighters (largely based on historical figures) face off against each other.

This first entry in the series gives you a choice of just eight characters, based on the likes of Rasputin, Bruce Lee and Genghis Khan, who provide a variety of fighting choices whether you are looking for a strong powerful brawler or someone a bit quicker. Hanzo and Fuuma are based on figures from feudal Japan, but also Street Fighter’s Ryu and Ken, serving as the good all-rounder options with some similar moves to the shotokan pair.

The game features a button for punch and a button to kick, and holding them down a bit longer performs a stronger attack. A four-button setup would be preferable, but it doesn’t really cause any trouble as the fighters move quite slowly. There’s also a throw button, but as pushing a direction with punch will also usually perform the move it is not often used. Each character also has some special moves at their disposal, and whilst a few could have used simpler input commands there’s a quite generous time allowed for you to perform the necessary button presses.

Simple controls and CPU opposition that’s not too tough makes World Heroes a game that’s quite newcomer friendly, but the slow pace lessens the enjoyment somewhat. There’s still some entertainment from knocking someone out of the air with a well-timed special attack or avoiding one of their moves and then countering with a throw or kick to the face. Subsequent games would tweak the gameplay and speed and ultimately the final instalment – World Heroes Perfect (already available on the eShop) – is the best of the bunch. This does offer something that game doesn’t however: death matches.

Death matches (dropped from the series with World Heroes 2 Jet) can be selected after picking your character, and these add hazards such as spikes and flaming ropes to the fighting arenas. These prove to be fun fights that add a bit of strategy as you try to stay away from the spiked edges or stay airborn when there are landmines scattered about. Some matches even combine dangers, so you may find yourself jumping away from an electrified barrier whilst trying not to land on a slippery oil puddle. Though it can get annoying when your opponent has you trapped against a hazard, the chaos helps hide the slow speed which makes for more enjoyable gaming.

Having beaten the other fighters you face off against shape-shifting metal man Geegus, who will morph into other characters during his fight against you; it’s a kind of cross between the T-1000 and Mortal Kombat’s Shang Tsung. Once defeated there’s some replayability as you go through again to see the endings of the other characters, or you could dive into the options menu to bump up the difficulty for a tougher challenge.

The usual ACA one credit Hi Score and five minute Caravan modes are available if you want to see how your point-scoring compares to players from around the world, and a second player can buy into the regular arcade mode at any time to challenge you to a fight. Two player battles are enjoyable, but if playing death matches there’s no way of selecting specific hazards other than playing through solo until you find what you are looking for and then having the second player join in.

Conclusion

There’s only eight characters and the simple combat setup means there are not as many moves available as in other one-on-one brawlers. The slow speed of the fights is another negative, but death matches liven things up a bit even if you can lose from poor positioning rather than something your opponent has done. Though not the most fully-featured series, subsequent games would add characters and tweak the gameplay (the regular World Heroes 2 also features death matches, though handled a little differently), and so whilst World Heroes can provide some fun fights, those desperately looking to pit historically-inspired fighters against each other would be better off with one of the sequels.

Details on the Innovative Xbox Control Scheme for PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds

Veteran players of PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds on PC are no doubt aware of the in-game inventory management and upgrades mixed with high-stakes gunplay that has made the game great. Translating these mechanics down to the Xbox One controller has been a challenge, but the team at PUBG Corp. — with support from the Xbox Advanced Technology Group and The Coalition, developers of the Gears of War franchise — believe they’ve found the right balance between giving players enough flexibility to survive in the hostile battleground and to effectively manage in-game equipment on the fly.

The first key thing to remember is that to see these controls, change look sensitivity, or invert the look axis simply hold the Menu button while in a match to bring up the in-game menu.

PUBG Xbox XGP Warrior Pack At The Ready

Basic

These will be your primary controls when navigating the world. Note that many of the buttons have a dual-purpose by either quickly pressing or holding down. For example, holding X will allow you to reload your weapon; tapping X will allow you to interact with objects. You’ll be interacting with a lot of objects in-game, quickly picking up items as fast as you can in the early going as you’re looking for weapons and equipment.

Notice that the DPAD directions can be used as quick action keys to cycle between for your grenades and healing items. For healing and boosts, tap the DPAD down button to cycle what you have and then hold briefly to start using that item without opening your inventory screen. Also, as is common in 3rd person action shooters, holding the Left Trigger will increase your accuracy while still in 3rd person view. Like the default on the PC, to aim down your weapon’s sights or scope for precision accuracy, tap the left trigger to enter the aiming mode and tap again to exit.

PUBG Controller Basic Image

Aim

When in Aim mode, the controls shift to primarily cater to those who have found themselves a nice perch to look for opponents, with options to hold breath and the utilization of the DPAD to change modes of fire (e.g. single shot). Note how both the LT and RT will be working together for you to use grenades while in Aim mode.

PUBG Controller Aim Image

Vehicle

The development team looked to keep this aspect as straight-forward as possible, modeling the controls after similar multiplayer shooters that have a driving component. Note that this is when you’re behind the wheel or in a vehicle — if you want to enter a vehicle, you’ll press X to interact with the vehicle’s doors. To quickly jump to the driver seat from any seat in the vehicle, briefly hold A button to get buckled in.

PUBG Controller Vehicle Image

Swim

Swimming is a full body effort when you’re navigating the currents in PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, so the ability to use your weapon while in water cannot be possible. You can, however, interact with any loot that you find while underwater for you to add to your inventory. Just remember to Dive (B button) to avoid being detected by enemies.

PUBG Controller Swim Image

Map

One of the key elements of PUBG throughout the course of the match is the reduction of the Blue Zone throughout the game. This area is randomly chosen in every match, so consulting your map about where that location is for you to get to safety is vital for your long(er)-term survival. Also, consult the map to avoid Red Zones as those randomly appear as well. You don’t want to fall victim to napalm from the sky.

PUBG Controller Map Image

Inventory

Switching between columns in your inventory guide (RB/LB) will be a key component as you move through your equipment and supplies while in-game. Use the A button to pick up a weapon from the inventory UI, then select which highlighted slot you’d like to place it, then press A again. The key here is that pressing X picks up items into your bag like ammo and attachments, A swaps and equips items with your current loadout, and Y always drops the selected or highlighted item.

To easily strip all attachments from your weapons, simply highlight the weapon in your inventory and hold X. This will place all attachments back into your inventory bag. This keeps them available to place on your next weapon of choice. You can also hold Y to strip all the attachments to the ground if your bag is too full before grabbing your new weapon.

PUBG Controller Inventory Image

We hope you’ve liked this early look at the controls for PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. Note that while these are the controls for PUBG‘s launch to Xbox Game Preview, PUBG Corp. will be monitoring all community feedback and may adjust some of these as necessary and your feedback will be key.

We can’t wait to see you on the island starting on Tuesday, December 12!

Enter The Gungeon Arrives on the Switch eShop Very Soon

Ever since it was confirmed for the Switch eShop early this year there have been some keen fans waiting for Enter the Gungeon. It’s a smartly designed roguelike in which you go into a run with the hope that a mix of skill, luck and perfect drops will see you make it all the way through. It has some smart twists to keep you going, too, as explained by our chums at Push Square.

Well, it’s not far away, as confirmed by the developer.

We really like the look of this one – the gameplay trailer below should demonstrate its case rather nicely.

So, are you tempted to pick this up?

Review: Arcade Archives Traverse USA (Switch eShop)

The Switch may still lack a Virtual Console, but HAMSTER is keen to fill that void. Having released many Neo Geo titles (with more appearing regularly), the company has now started to bring other retro delights to the system. It’s already released one of Nintendo’s own games and now here’s the first offering from Irem’s library: highscore-chasing racer Arcade Archives Traverse USA.

The game is also known by a few other names, such as MotoRace USA and MotoTour. In Japan it went by the name Zippy Race and this version is also available to play from the main menu. This inclusion will not surprise anyone who has picked up one of HAMSTER’s Neo Geo re-releases and the various options, menu screens and modes will also seem familiar.

For those that haven’t picked up a title from the ACA Neo Geo series, know that these options allow you to remap buttons to your liking and to add scanlines (and even a scrolling horizontal video line) to the image for that old-school CRT look. There are game-specific options too and in this case you can adjust how quickly your fuel burns off or whether to have the speed displayed in kilometres or miles per hour. HAMSTER’s usual Hi Score and Caravan modes are also included that limit you to one credit and five minutes respectively. With these restrictions you try to get as high a score as possible to move up the online leaderboards, but otherwise the aim of the game is the same.

Said aim of the game is to race your bike across America from Los Angeles to New York. For reasons unexplained you are racing against cars and you’ll want to pass as many as possible, as points and fuel are awarded based on your placement when you reach a checkpoint. Further points can be gained by passing through certain narrow paths (indicated on screen with their points value), driving over jump ramps or passing through a “wheelie zone”. 

Your fuel burns off as you ride, with further deductions for collisions with cars and obstacles. Fuel cans are available along your route (ride over to refill) but should your tank empty it is game over. Extra credits are just a button press away however, so you can continue on your journey should you wish. This results in a score reset, but does serve as a way to see the sights of the game, although as this is a game from 1983 those sights are not particularly impressive.

The game takes two approaches to the cross-country bike-riding with you beginning in a top-down view, which is the main part of each trek between cities. Here is where you do your overtaking as you attempt to move up the 99-place field. Bends and obstacles in the road add to the challenge as does the fact cars will try to cut across your path. The visuals are basic, using block colours for the road and roadside, but your bike, your rivals and some objects/buildings use a bit more colour.

The second part of each ride (which the game cuts to somewhat abruptly) uses a behind the rider view and has you drive a short straight, avoiding oncoming traffic. Places cannot be gained/lost and you are simply trying to stay on your bike to avoid loosing too much fuel. A simple city can be seen on the horizon (the Las Vegas one is well done) and there’s no trackside scenery, making these short sections less varied and more basic looking than the top-down parts despite the pseudo-3D appearance.

If playing undocked you may want to make use of the option to rotate the screen 90 degrees, allowing you to play in TATE mode. By default the screen is still square, but it can be stretched to fit the Switch screen (as much/little as you wish) which actually gives the cars a more natural appearance compared to the squat default look.

Audio-wise there’s some basic but inoffensive music and some similarly simple sounds (screeching tyres, crunches) that actually work quite well as you work through (or try to work through) the field. The racing gets steadily tougher as you progress with more turns and harder to avoid traffic, and you have to make split-second decisions if you are hoping to stay on your bike.

After you’ve completed the trip to New York the game loops back to the beginning, only this time at a faster, tougher speed: 750cc compared to 500cc. Complete it again and you move up to 1200cc with further loops continuing at this class. Just playing through the game over and over gets dull, but if you’re highscore chasing then it’s a lot more fun as you try to improve your riding to stay on your bike as long as possible and move up the placings.

Trying to improve your score works best with the Hi Score and Caravan modes, but if you’d rather see how you do compared to one person rather than the world then the game allows two-player alternating play; the player changing when the current one comes off their bike. Play undocked and the game can be set to flip the screen when the current player changes, allowing people to sit opposite each other and pretend they are playing on a cocktail arcade cabinet.

Conclusion

Traverse USA is a game that looks, sounds and plays simply, but is one that gets surprisingly fun as you weave about the screen avoiding obstacles, gaining places and passing through narrow gaps for a points bonus. If you are just looking to complete the ride to New York then the game is not particularly entertaining, but it works well with the Hi Score and Caravan modes and it feels satisfying to stay on your bike for long sections of road; positions gained from this also helping your points tally. Traverse USA is unlikely to be the Irem game people wanted HAMSTER to start with, but still works as something to dip into for a quick bout of highscore chasing.

Review: Traverse USA (Switch eShop)

The Switch may still lack a Virtual Console, but HAMSTER is keen to fill that void. Having released many Neo Geo titles (with more appearing regularly), the company has now started to bring other retro delights to the system. It’s already released one of Nintendo’s own games and now here’s the first offering from Irem’s library: highscore-chasing racer Traverse USA.

The game is also known by a few other names, such as MotoRace USA and MotoTour. In Japan it went by the name Zippy Race and this version is also available to play from the main menu. This inclusion will not surprise anyone who has picked up one of HAMSTER’s Neo Geo re-releases and the various options, menu screens and modes will also seem familiar.

For those that haven’t picked up a title from the ACA Neo Geo series, know that these options allow you to remap buttons to your liking and to add scanlines (and even a scrolling horizontal video line) to the image for that old-school CRT look. There are game-specific options too and in this case you can adjust how quickly your fuel burns off or whether to have the speed displayed in kilometres or miles per hour. HAMSTER’s usual Hi Score and Caravan modes are also included that limit you to one credit and five minutes respectively. With these restrictions you try to get as high a score as possible to move up the online leaderboards, but otherwise the aim of the game is the same.

Said aim of the game is to race your bike across America from Los Angeles to New York. For reasons unexplained you are racing against cars and you’ll want to pass as many as possible, as points and fuel are awarded based on your placement when you reach a checkpoint. Further points can be gained by passing through certain narrow paths (indicated on screen with their points value), driving over jump ramps or passing through a “wheelie zone”. 

Your fuel burns off as you ride, with further deductions for collisions with cars and obstacles. Fuel cans are available along your route (ride over to refill) but should your tank empty it is game over. Extra credits are just a button press away however, so you can continue on your journey should you wish. This results in a score reset, but does serve as a way to see the sights of the game, although as this is a game from 1983 those sights are not particularly impressive.

The game takes two approaches to the cross-country bike-riding with you beginning in a top-down view, which is the main part of each trek between cities. Here is where you do your overtaking as you attempt to move up the 99-place field. Bends and obstacles in the road add to the challenge as does the fact cars will try to cut across your path. The visuals are basic, using block colours for the road and roadside, but your bike, your rivals and some objects/buildings use a bit more colour.

The second part of each ride (which the game cuts to somewhat abruptly) uses a behind the rider view and has you drive a short straight, avoiding oncoming traffic. Places cannot be gained/lost and you are simply trying to stay on your bike to avoid loosing too much fuel. A simple city can be seen on the horizon (the Las Vegas one is well done) and there’s no trackside scenery, making these short sections less varied and more basic looking than the top-down parts despite the pseudo-3D appearance.

If playing undocked you may want to make use of the option to rotate the screen 90 degrees, allowing you to play in TATE mode. By default the screen is still square, but it can be stretched to fit the Switch screen (as much/little as you wish) which actually gives the cars a more natural appearance compared to the squat default look.

Audio-wise there’s some basic but inoffensive music and some similarly simple sounds (screeching tyres, crunches) that actually work quite well as you work through (or try to work through) the field. The racing gets steadily tougher as you progress with more turns and harder to avoid traffic, and you have to make split-second decisions if you are hoping to stay on your bike.

After you’ve completed the trip to New York the game loops back to the beginning, only this time at a faster, tougher speed: 750cc compared to 500cc. Complete it again and you move up to 1200cc with further loops continuing at this class. Just playing through the game over and over gets dull, but if you’re highscore chasing then it’s a lot more fun as you try to improve your riding to stay on your bike as long as possible and move up the placings.

Trying to improve your score works best with the Hi Score and Caravan modes, but if you’d rather see how you do compared to one person rather than the world then the game allows two-player alternating play; the player changing when the current one comes off their bike. Play undocked and the game can be set to flip the screen when the current player changes, allowing people to sit opposite each other and pretend they are playing on a cocktail arcade cabinet.

Conclusion

Traverse USA is a game that looks, sounds and plays simply, but is one that gets surprisingly fun as you weave about the screen avoiding obstacles, gaining places and passing through narrow gaps for a points bonus. If you are just looking to complete the ride to New York then the game is not particularly entertaining, but it works well with the Hi Score and Caravan modes and it feels satisfying to stay on your bike for long sections of road; positions gained from this also helping your points tally. Traverse USA is unlikely to be the Irem game people wanted HAMSTER to start with, but still works as something to dip into for a quick bout of highscore chasing.

Next Week on Xbox: New Games for December 11 – 17

Welcome to Next Week on Xbox where we bring you the latest details on upcoming games coming soon to Xbox One! This coming week we have the console launch exclusive PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds coming to Xbox Game Preview, the return of an iconic gaming character in Okami HD, and several ID@Xbox titles like It’s Quiz Time, Night in the Woods, and Hammerwatch. Read on below for more details on these games and more.

Okami HD Screenshot Games
Xbox One X Enhanced The critically acclaimed masterpiece returns in breathtaking high resolution. Take on the role of Amaterasu, the Japanese sun goddess, who inhabits the form of a legendary white wolf on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon and tyrannical monster responsible for turning the world of Nippon into a ruined wasteland.
PUBG Screenshot Games
Xbox Game Preview / Console Launch Exclusive / Xbox One X Enhanced Parachute onto a massive remote island with nothing but your wits and the clothes on your back. Explore, loot and locate weapons or use vehicles to find supplies and gear-up for fast-paced combat. Go solo or team up with other players as you engage in a heart-racing fight to the be the last person left alive. Defeat every player on the map to earn your bragging rights as the last player left standing. PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is Xbox One X Enhanced, with High Dynamic Range and 4K support to bring out the true visual depth of the battleground.
Night in the Woods ScreenshotGames
Night in the Woods is an adventure game focused on exploration, story, and character, featuring dozens of characters to meet and lots to do across a lush, vibrant world. Play as college dropout Mae Borowski, who returns home to the crumbling former mining town of Possum Springs seeking to reconnect with the friends she left behind. But things aren’t the same. Home seems different now and her friends have grown and changed… and strange things are happening at night. There’s something in the woods.
Lost Grimoires 2 Shard of Mystery Screenshot Games
When Prince Fern goes missing just days before his coronation, only one person in the king’s court can find him. Step in the shoes of the teacher, spy and advisor of House Griff and embark on a dangerous adventure to find the heir and save him from the clutches of dark magic in this hidden object puzzle game from the creators of Enigmatis and Grim Legends.
Circuits Screenshot Games
Circuits is a musical puzzle game that requires careful listening to complete each level where you must piece together the different parts of a song. Packed with beautifully designed minimal graphics and 25 different songs for the player to reconstruct.
Future War ScreenshotGames
In this post-apocalyptic world full of zombies, mutants, and aliens, humans must fight for their survival. Take aim at massive enemy hordes, build turrets to drive them away, or drive war machines over this scum. Rescue the last survivors of humanity and retreat to safe havens away from the enemy in this isometric tactical shoot-em-up. Of course, countless monsters will ambush you on your journey and the only way to survive is to destroy them all.
Hammerwatch Screenshot Games
Journey to Castle Hammerwatch in this fantasy-based pixel art adventure either solo or local co-op with up to four friends. Battle hordes of enemies across unique environments with traps, hidden secrets, and puzzles. Master seven different classes, including the Sorcerer, a new class coming first to consoles, and unlock and upgrade their unique abilities. Also includes the Temple of the Sun campaign.
Its Quiz Time ScreenshotGames
Go head-to-head with the biggest trivia game on console… ever! Featuring a witty and devious AI, take on It’s Quiz Time’s catalog of over 25,000 questions. Face off against up to 8 players using your smartphone or grab your controller. You can also take advantage of the games Live Show mode to stream and play along with your audience, or share your results with friends directly from the companion app.
Ultimate Chicken Horse ScreenshotGames
Ultimate Chicken Horse is a party platformer game where you build the level as you play, placing traps and hazards to mess with your friends (be careful not to mess yourself up in the process). If you can make it to the end of the level, but your friends can’t, you score points! Each round, players add more to the level and it becomes increasingly interesting and dangerous.
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Environmental artist Jane Ng only made 23 unique trees for Firewatch

Lead artist at Campo Santo Jane Ng recently presented at the NYU game center about her work as an environmental artist on Firewatch, mentioning how she only modeled 23 different trees featured in the game. 

Ng emphasized that designers don’t need to create hyper-realistic, detailed assets in order to be memorable, but to focus on “feeling real”.

She discussed the importance of atmosphere over realism when modeling the environment of Firewatch, citing a technical limitation for the reason she manually had to create the trees.

“I had to make it by hand because Speedtree was not integrated in Unity back then.” She explains. “It can be done but you also realize that very few games have pine trees, because of all trees in the world pine trees are the worst in terms of being made 3D.” 

The environment of Firewatch doesn’t feel repetitive because, according to Ng, objects and places were scaled based on what felt right as opposed to what was accurate. 

Definitely check out the presentation to hear more about her creative process during the development of Firewatch.

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Reigns: Her Majesty’s Francois Alliot on making a more complex swipe-em-up

If you’ve picked up Reigns: Her Majesty already, you might have noticed that Nerial’s sequel to the 2016 surprise hit Reigns is a bit more complex than its goofy predecessor. While it’s one thing for a game sequel to have new mechanics, it’s another for it to explore entirely new themes while still preserving the cheekiness of its predecessor. 

Thankfully, over on the Gamasutra Twitch channel, we were lucky enough today to be joined by lead developer Francois Alliot, who did much of the work on the first Reigns, and who partnered with former Gamasutra editor Leigh Alexander on the second. 

Alliot was kind enough to answer our questions about working on the game, and you can see those answers in the video up above. In case you’re already running from the peasants however, we do have a few takeaways for your convenience down below. 

“Tinder is a toy” – the philosophy behind every Reigns interaction

One interesting design highlight from Alliot is that everything from the swiping mechanic to the iOS vibrations to the “glitching screens” seen in the game comes from the idea that to Alliot, the dating app Tinder is more a toy than a human connection program. To Alliot, the design of Tinder indicates an expressive, infinite experience that takes over the entire mobile device, and “traps” users in a way that’s mirrored in the endless death cycle of Reigns‘ heroine. 

By building off that philosophy, Alliot says he was able to expand the card-swiping interaction beyond just simple binary choices, and create pleasantly surprising scenarios that stayed true to the oddball tone of the narrative. 

Reigns: Her Majesty is about the weirdness of royalty as seen by women

According to Alliot, there are two reasons Reigns: Her Majesty is a sequel instead of another expansion for Reigns. First, adding all of the new content for a Queen character would have doubled the size of the original game. Second, Alliot says he thought it was important to recruit a woman as a writing partner (in this case, Alexander) to properly explore the nuances he couldn’t with his own creative style. 

It’s important to note these nuances while playing the game because it’s striking how different the perspective of the characters are from the first game. There’s jokes about lust, power, and tradition that give the game a fresh feel thanks to the collaboration with Alexander (at one point, Alliot points out which cards have interactions that come from both of them, highlighting how well these two work together)

The business of a small interactive fiction developer

We also quizzed Alliot about the production process for this quickly-timed sequel, and it turns out he’s been trying to keep as level-headed as he can about this whole indie business as one can be. As a small developer, he says he’s focused a lot on trying to be able to complete production without going through insane crunch, as well as setting up fair financial deals for his collaborators. 

For instance, on Reigns: Her Majesty, Alliot says he offered his fellow creatives an option between either getting a share of revenue after the game shipped, with a smaller salary, or a larger salary in exchange for no revenue share. 

It was also interesting to hear Alliot describe his reasons for seeking out Devolver Digital as a publisher. He told us that while a lot of indies see themselves as jacks-of-all-trades, he preferred to set up a business deal with someone more experienced in marketing and communications than he was, so he could stick to his core skills he felt most comfortable with. 

For more developer interviews, editor roundtables and gameplay commentary, be sure to follow the Gamasutra Twitch channel.

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Video: Why real time-destruction is the core of Rainbow Six: Siege

There’s a lot of destruction in Rainbow Six: Siege, and it’s such an important feature for the game that an entire engine was built to handle it. 

In this 2016 GDC session Ubisoft’s Julien L’Heureux discusses the process of developing and implementing the destruction engine Realblast. He shares the technical difficulties encountered when it came time to integrate the engine into Rainbow Six: Siege, which is what causes all of the destruction featured in the game. 

Designers interested in learning how Rainbow Six: Siege was developed may appreciate the fact that you can now go back and watch the talk completely free via the official GDC Vault YouTube channel!

In addition to this presentation, the GDC Vault and YouTube channel offers numerous other free videos, audio recordings, and slides from many of the recent Game Developers Conference events, and the service offers even more members-only content for GDC Vault subscribers.

Those who purchased All Access passes to recent events like GDC, GDC Europe, and GDC Next already have full access to GDC Vault, and interested parties can apply for the individual subscription via a GDC Vault subscription page. Group subscriptions are also available: game-related schools and development studios who sign up for GDC Vault Studio Subscriptions can receive access for their entire office or company by contacting staff via the GDC Vault group subscription page. Finally, current subscribers with access issues can contact GDC Vault technical support.

Gamasutra and GDC are sibling organizations under parent UBM Americas.